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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Food Allergies : Shellfish, Nuts, Peanut, Egg, Cow's milk

What is food allergies?


Food allergies are disorders with hypersensitivity to certain foods that can lead to various physical complaints. These complaints range from fairly innocent itch, hives, diarrhea and kisses to potentially lethal respiratory problems and swellings. It is extremely common worldwide, namely 8 percent of children and 5 percent of adults. And these percentages rise.

Although any food can cause allergy, this occurs mainly in cow's milk, eggs, nuts, peanuts and seafood. What is the impact on the daily life of food allergy patients?

Food Allergies : Shellfish, Nuts, Peanut, Egg, Cow's milk


Type of food allergy


Food allergies can be categorized into two main types: IgE allergy or non-IgE allergy. The difference is him in the presence of antibodies in the blood. These are proteins in the immune system to prevent or fight infections. In an IgE food allergy, these antibodies are released by the immune system, and in non-IgE food allergy this is not the case. As a result, the immune system must otherwise fight the infection.


  • Shellfish allergy

This allergy is predominantly triggered by the protein tropomyosin, which occurs in shellfish. Symptoms are rapidly evolving and are similar to those of other IgE allergies. These are therefore rashes, hives, kisses and anaphylaxis.

People with a shellfish allergy generally never come from. And even steam while cooking seafood can trigger an allergic reaction.


  • Nuts allergy

Nut allergy, in contrast to milk and egg allergy, is often not temporary. People with this allergy probably do not probably have their entire life away and may develop an allergy to other nuts. It is therefore wise to avoid all notes.

The symptoms may be severe and people with a nut allergy are advised to have an EpiPen at all times. This is an adrenaline injection that narrows the blood vessels, which makes infection less likely to spread. Nuts are responsible for 50 percent of fatal cases of anaphylaxis.


  • Peanut allergy

Peanuts are of course no nuts but legumes. Nevertheless, peanut allergy people are also allergic to nuts. And peanut allergy sometimes also leads to anaphylaxis, which makes it necessary to carry an EpiPen.

Peanut allergy occurs in 4 to 8 percent of the children, and 1 to 2 percent of adults. The allergy disappears at 15 to 22 percent in the teenage years.

  • Egg allergy

In egg allergy it may be protein or egg yolk, but fewer people are allergic to the yolk. Egg allergy occurs most commonly in children after lactose allergy, but this allergy often disappears as they age. 68 percent are from their 16th year of life.

Symptoms of egg allergy are problems with digestion, abdominal pain, rash, hives, respiratory distress and anaphylaxis. An egg free diet is very difficult to follow because eggs are often used as an ingredient. Fortunately, many people with egg allergy can eat dishes with cooked eggs as a component, because the cooking process changes the structure of the harmful protein.

  • Cow's milk allergy

Allergy for cow's milk is very common in babies and young children. About 2 to 3 percent suffer from the condition, mainly when they have bought cow's milk within six months of their birth. By that age, the immune system has not yet been sufficiently developed to process the foreign protein from dairy products. Fortunately, the condition continues at 90 percent around their 3rd year of life.

People with IgE allergy to cow's milk get symptoms such as rash, hives, kisses and even even anaphylactic shock (a sudden reaction that may have fatal consequences if breathing problems and swelling may occur). While people with non-IgE allergy experience symptoms such as kisses, constipation / diarrhea or bowel wall inflammation. Logically, people with lactose allergy should avoid consuming milk, cheese, butter and ice.

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