Advertise Here

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Symptoms And Treatment Of Hepatitis B

What is hepatitis B?


Hepatitis B is a form of hepatitis.

Hepatitis B usually goes mild. The disease then automatically reverts. Sometimes the disease is indeed serious. Then, damages the liver.

You can be infected with the hepatitis B virus through blood and sexual contact.

Symptoms And Treatment Of Hepatitis B | what is hepatitis b


What are the signs and symptoms of hepatitis B?


Symptoms of hepatitis B may include:
  1. tiredness;
  2. not feel like eating;
  3. drowsiness;
  4. pain in muscles and joints;
  5. fever, flu-like symptoms;
  6. jaundice;
  7. dark-colored urine;
  8. itching;
  9. coma (very rare).

signs and symptoms - treatment of hepatitis B

Hepatitis B can become chronic. The disease is no longer about. Which is more likely in people with little resistance, for instance babies. In babies, the risk even nine out of ten that hepatitis B becomes chronic.
In chronic hepatitis, the liver is not working properly or it will shrivel. There may also arise liver cancer. One hundred people with hepatitis B do not survive the disease.

What is the treatment for hepatitis B?


Hepatitis B which is not chronic, called acute hepatitis B disease. Acute hepatitis B heals itself. You will need to have regular blood tests. Furthermore, it is important that you rest when you're tired and you do not drink alcohol.

Chronic hepatitis B has to be treated. There are two different treatments:
  1. Peginterferon a cure. Peginterferon improves the resistance of your body. During the treatment you give yourself a few times a week injection. The treatment takes about one year. Not everyone with chronic hepatitis B can receive this treatment. Your doctor will tell you more about this.
  2. Antiviral drugs such as lamivudine. These resources take as tablets. If you are using lamivudine for more than six months, the hepatitis B virus may insensitive (resistant) are used for this product. You will get another antiviral drug your doctor.

Hepatitis B, C and D in pregnancy


Pregnant women who are carriers of the hepatitis B, C or D virus can infect their babies. That can during childbirth or when breastfeeding. As carrier do you have no complaints but you can the virus be pass on to your child.

The chance to infect your baby with hepatitis C is small: less than five percent.

Hepatitis D occurs only in combination with hepatitis B And hepatitis B are all pregnant women tested in Netherlands.

You have hepatitis B? Then get your baby within two hours after birth an inoculation. Follow later more inoculations against hepatitis b. this happens on the consultation Office or at the public health service. After the first inoculation you can breastfeed without infecting your baby.

Is your child protected against hepatitis B, then it can also no hepatitis D get more.

How do you prevent hepatitis B?


You can be infected with the hepatitis B virus through blood and sexual contact. The virus is found in blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and (less) in saliva.

Especially blood contamination is common. This can in many ways:
  1. Contact with blood from a small wound from an infected person sometimes causes an infection.
  2. Non-sterile needles can transmit an infection, for example in drug use, when applying tattoos and piercings and acupuncture.
  3. Razors and toothbrushes that may transmit infection used together with someone.
The Dutch blood bank controls all blood products. Infection through a blood transfusion or organ donation is therefore almost impossible.

To prevent contamination by:
  1. To safe sex (with a condom);
  2. To avoid blood contact.
You can also let you vaccinate against hepatitis B. The vaccine provides protection for about fifteen years.

These people are more likely to hepatitis B:
  1. Dialysis patients;
  2. People who receive blood products regularly;
  3. People with Down's syndrome;
  4. Mental disabilities in institutions;
  5. Drug users;
  6. medical and paramedical staff.
Do you belong to one of these groups? Then you can best be vaccinated.

Subscribe to this Blog via Email :